07172017

Had a really nice past few days with Steve, even though we didn’t do anything too special.

Thursday night we saw Spider-man: Homecoming, which I thought was a little too long but overall, cute and fun. I still haven’t quite gotten used to the movie theaters that have reclining seats in them but I have to admit they are comfy. I’m sure it won’t be long before I wind up falling asleep in one of them :).

Friday night I tried my hand at making pizza using beer in the crust. We had an odd number of Saint Arnold’s Art Car IPA, so I used the extra one in the recipe. It turned out pretty well but I think a different, darker beer might work better. Steve suggested Fat Tire and I think that would probably be really good!

Earlier in the week, a local furniture bank sent a truck out to pick up our old bed, which had been sitting in our garage since we moved to this apartment a few months ago. We knew before we even moved that we wanted to get rid of it. It’s too big and not very comfortable. But it’s hardly been used, so we wanted to find a good home for it if we could, and we didn’t have time to do that before packing up, so we just wound up bringing it along with us.

It took a lot of hunting to find a charity that would take it but I finally did. I’m glad the bed will now most likely be going to someone who can use it, and I’m also SO glad to have that crossed off my to-do list! The garage looks so much better now, too, without the mattresses and such stacked in it. Yesterday Steve and I re-arranged the stuff that’s left in there and it looks even nicer and neater now. It’s awesome every time we open the door and go in there.

No, it doesn’t take much to excite me :).

Yesterday was National Ice Cream Day, or so Steve told me. We went to get milkshakes. Mine was Oreo.

We started watching “Ash Vs. Evil Dead” on DVD from Netflix over the weekend. I don’t watch TV shows anymore, really, unless they are “Supernatural” or “The X-Files,” but we both wanted to give this one a shot because it ties into the Evil Dead movie series. We got through the first disc really quickly. It’s pretty hilarious so far — and gory. Groovy :).

Still watching “Twin Peaks: The Return,” too. It’s so bizarre, but I look forward to watching it every Sunday night. I hope there’s another season after this because it doesn’t seem as if the plot is going to wrap up in only 8 more episodes…or as if much of anything is really going to happen at all, TBH. Ha. But I am such a Lynch/”Twin Peaks” junkie, I really don’t mind. I will watch and/or read anything related to the show.

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Proof. Although I kinda feel like I need that little Funko log lady to make this complete.

I finished reading Just Kids by Patti Smith yesterday. It started off so cute but by the end it was a total bummer. I got to thinking about how, even though Patti and Robert Mapplethorpe were best friends for over twenty years, he has now been dead longer than they knew one another :(. The idea left me in a bit of a melancholy mood. But that is one more book knocked off the virtual TBR pile.

In happier news, the paperback version of The Real You should be available by the end of the week :). This has been largely Steve’s project and I’m so grateful he not only knows how to do these sorts of formatting-type-things, but that he’s willing to, and that he seems to enjoy it. The end product looks so great, I think. Can’t wait to give away some copies!

XOXO,

Books # 10 – 15

#10: Factotum, by Charles Bukowksi

One of Charles Bukowski’s best, this beer-soaked, deliciously degenerate novel follows the wanderings of aspiring writer Henry Chinaski across World War II-era America. Deferred from military service, Chinaski travels from city to city, moving listlessly from one odd job to another, always needing money but never badly enough to keep a job. His day-to-day existence spirals into an endless litany of pathetic whores, sordid rooms, dreary embraces, and drunken brawls, as he makes his bitter, brilliant way from one drink to the next.

Charles Bukowski’s posthumous legend continues to grow. Factotum is a masterfully vivid evocation of slow-paced, low-life urbanity and alcoholism, and an excellent introduction to the fictional world of Charles Bukowski.


I liked this a lot, although not as much as Ham on Rye. Factotum is quite funny but in a dark way, since the main character is a terrible alcoholic and his life is bleak. The book is much shorter than I’d anticipated. I read it in two days!

#11: Post Office, by Charles Bukowski

“It began as a mistake.” By middle age, Henry Chinaski has lost more than twelve years of his life to the U.S. Postal Service. In a world where his three true, bitter pleasures are women, booze, and racetrack betting, he somehow drags his hangover out of bed every dawn to lug waterlogged mailbags up mud-soaked mountains, outsmart vicious guard dogs, and pray to survive the day-to-day trials of sadistic bosses and certifiable coworkers. This classic 1971 novel—the one that catapulted its author to national fame—is the perfect introduction to the grimly hysterical world of legendary writer, poet, and Dirty Old Man Charles Bukowski and his fictional alter ego, Chinaski.


Like Factotum, this one was shorter than I’d anticipated. It went really quickly! This was darkly funny and interesting and I enjoyed it (although I probably liked Ham On Rye and Factotum better).

Btw, when I was a kid, I wrote a lot of letters to pen pals. I loved mail, and I used to think it would be so fun to work at the Post Office. This makes it sound awful, though. Ha.

#12: Heartless, by Marissa Meyer

Long before she was the terror of Wonderland, she was just a girl who wanted to fall in love. Catherine may be one of the most desired girls in Wonderland, and a favorite of the unmarried King of Hearts, but her interests lie elsewhere. A talented baker, all she wants is to open a shop with her best friend. But according to her mother, such a goal is unthinkable for the young woman who could be the next queen.

Then Cath meets Jest, the handsome and mysterious court joker. For the first time, she feels the pull of true attraction. At the risk of offending the king and infuriating her parents, she and Jest enter into an intense, secret courtship. Cath is determined to define her own destiny and fall in love on her terms. But in a land thriving with magic, madness, and monsters, fate has other plans.

In her first stand-alone teen novel, the New York Times-bestselling author dazzles us with a prequel to Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.


I’m not a big Alice in Wonderland fan but I wanted to read this because I enjoyed Marissa Meyer’s Lunar Chronicles so, so much. I’d read the excerpt for this, too, and liked it. Ultimately, however, the book just wasn’t for me. It’s not that I disliked the writing – it is well-written – it just wasn’t my kind of story. Too dark for my taste. I’m still looking forward to Renegades, though.

#13: Dressed To Kiss, by various authors

True love never goes out of style….

Once renowned for creating the most envied gowns in London, Madame Follette’s dressmaking shop has fallen far out of fashion. The approaching coronation of King George IV offers a chance to reclaim former glory by supplying stunning new wardrobes to the most glittering society in Regency England. In the face of long-held secrets, looming scandals, and the potential ruin of their shop, the dressmakers of Follette’s are undaunted, not even by the most unexpected complication of all: true love.

The Duke’s Dressmaker by Madeline Hunter

When the Duke of Barrowmore walks into the dress shop, Selina Fontaine assumes her secret identity will compromised. Four years ago this man’s brother seduced her and abandoned her to scandal, and she holds the duke responsible. To her amazement the duke is more interested in pursuing her than exposing her, however—and that pursuit soon becomes seductively pleasurable.

The Colors of Love by Myretta Robens

Delyth Owen’s exuberant passion for her new job as a dressmaker at Madame Follette’s is matched only by her love of diverse, vibrant, and frequently unfortunate color combinations. Simon Merrithew, the pseudonymous author of a well-regarded fashion column, is horrified by the gown Delyth creates for a friend, and suspects her motives. He sets out to uncover her duplicity, but instead, he uncovers genuine joy and discovers the colors of love.

No Accounting for Love by Megan Frampton

Miss Katherine Grant is a lady’s companion, one whose number of dishonorable offers (six) greatly outweigh her honorable ones (zero). Now tasked with making certain her charge, Lady Euphemia, does not contract herself to someone inappropriate, she finds herself inexplicably drawn to Mr. Henry Dawkins, the inappropriate gentleman Lady Euphemia wants to charm, who keeps the books at Madame Follette’s. But it seems that Henry only has eyes for Miss Katherine Grant.

A Fashionable Affair by Caroline Linden

Madame Follette’s is Felicity Dawkins’s birthright; her mother founded it, and now she runs it. She’s fiercely committed to making it the most exclusive modiste in London. The Earl of Carmarthen also has big plans for the shop—he wants to buy it and tear it down, to make way for a grand new boulevard of shops. One way or another, he’s determined to persuade Felicity…not only to sell her shop, but to explore the passion that sparks between them every time they meet.


When I first heard about this book, I knew I wanted to read it. I’ve read a lot by Megan Frampton already and I like her humorous writing style, plus the premise of this book just sounded too cute. I like anthologies where all the different stories are inter-connected, and I wanted to read about the dress shop. I wasn’t disappointed; this turned out to be super cute. I enjoyed the first story best, and will definitely look for more books by the author, Madeline Hunter, because I liked her minimal writing style a lot, but all of the stories were entertaining in different ways. I will probably look for more stuff by all of the writers, actually.

#14: With My Eyes Wide Open, by Brian Welch

He left KoRn to help himself. He went back to help others. And along the way, he nearly lost everything.

A life-changing spiritual awakening freed Brian “Head” Welch from a stranglehold of drugs and alcohol and prompted him to leave the highly successful nu-metal band KoRn in 2005. What followed was a decade-long trial by fire, from the perils of fathering a teen lost in depression and self-mutilation to the harsh realities of playing solo and surviving the shattering betrayal of a trusted friend. In this intensely inspiring redemption saga, perhaps most inspiring is Brian’s radical decision to rejoin KoRn and reconcile with the tribe of people he once considered family in the metal music scene.

Brian returned to his musical roots with a clear head and a devoted heart. Though his story is wild, hilarious, and deeply poignant, the message is simple: God will love you into the freedom of being yourself, as long as you keep the relationship going and never, ever quit.


I read Brian’s previous book, Save Me From Myself and really liked it. This one was great, too; it was interesting to learn what happened to him after he left the band, and why he ultimately decided to rejoin Korn. I’m glad he did, because I love the band so much and I definitely think they are better with Brian around!

#15: Got the Life, by Fieldy

From Reggie “Fieldy” Arvizu, legendary bassist of nu-metal pioneers KORN, comes Got the Life: a no-holds-barred look at his extreme highs, drug- and-booze-fueled lows, and, finally, redemption through a conversion to Christianity. Got the Life is simultaneously an insider’s look at rock n’ roll superstardom—the good, the bad, and everything in between—and a survivor’s story of a life brought back from the precipice by a new found belief in religious salvation.


After finishing With My Eyes Wide Open I felt like reading more about Korn. I’m glad I did because this was so good! I’ve read a lot of “rock star books” over the years and it can get tiresome hearing about their binges, but I do always enjoy a good redemption story. This one seems like nothing short of a miracle, given just how horrible Fieldy’s self-described behavior was. He definitely doesn’t try to sugar-coat his past, and even for a rock star he sounds bad :(. But of course his life is completely different now and I’m very glad for him (and for us Korn fans :)).

Lots of travel, running, beer-drinking, and rock.

Just a quick update on what I’ve been doing with myself these past few months…:)

I’ve been fairly busy. Steve and I moved cities back in March and we’ve also been on several small trips, so it feels as though I’ve been “in transit” quite a lot this year.

In April we took a pretty big trip to Orlando, FL, to participate in the Star Wars Dark Side Challenge at Disney World. This was a 10K on Saturday followed by a half marathon on Sunday. We also did the 5K on Friday because…you know, that wasn’t enough running for us, apparently :). It was an, uh, interesting experience; one I’m not in a big hurry to have again, frankly! But I’m glad we went. We did have fun.

We flew to FL but drove back to TX afterward. Along the way, we stopped in New Orleans, LA because neither of us had ever been there before. That was interesting and fun, too. We had iced coffee and beignets at Café du Monde (not the super-popular one, but a different location in the city):

cafe du monde coffee and beignets

D-licious…although they kinda skimp on the powdered sugar, don’t they?! 😉

…and on our way out of the city, we made a detour to Oak Alley Plantation, where we took a guided tour of the house and self-guided tour of an exhibit about slavery. Part of the movie Interview with the Vampire was filmed here. The house and grounds were quite gorgeous!

We got back home just in time for my birthday. Steve took me to see PJ Harvey in concert and then the following weekend we went to Dallas for the Texas Frightmare Weekend horror convention, where we met E.G. Daily, Michael Berryman (got those two to sign our The Devil’s Rejects poster) and Dario Argento!(!!)

Steve and I are also doing this Texas 6-pack 5K beer challenge thing this year, where you participate in a bunch of races at different independent craft breweries around the state. Each race benefits a different local charity. We’ve completed five so far, in San Marcos, Goliad, San Antonio, Seven Points, and Katy. These events have all been super fun, even if coming back from Seven Points (about an hour outside Dallas), we got stuck in major traffic for hours :(! Boo!!

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This “Sittin’ Sidehaze” from No Label Brewing Co. has been one of my favorites we’ve tried so far. I had two! :O

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Although I was excited to finally try the “Brew of H,” too — being a UH alum and all :).

Earlier this month we saw At the Drive-In, Metallica, and Iron Maiden in concert (not all at the same time, though, ha). They were all awesome performances and I’m really grateful I got to see them. Metallica and Maiden both have super impressive visual effects and stage shows! If you get the chance to check them out, I highly recommend it!

I think that’s all the fun stuff for now. Aside from that, I have been doing the usual:  being a hermit, doing housework, reading and writing most of the day :). Luckily, these are my favorite ways to spend the time. I’ll post an update on some of the books I’ve finished reading soon. It feels as though there a ton of them. What have you guys been up to?! I hope you’re well. xoxo,

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More books!

Here a few more books I’ve read so far this year. All descriptions are from Amazon.

(Btw, there are gaps in the numbering because I don’t write about everything I read. For the most part, I only write about the older titles [and post the write-ups on LibraryThing] as part of my effort to conquer the TBR pile. I am part of a group there that tracks older books read. If you’re interested in seeing the complete list of books I’ve read for the year, I catalogue pretty much everything on my LT profile. I’m on Goodreads, too, but I haven’t finished adding every book over there yet. Feel free to add me as a friend on either or both platform(s). :))

#4: Seven Deadly Sins: Settling the Argument Between Born Bad and Damaged Good, by Corey Taylor

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For the first time, Slipknot and Stone Sour frontman Corey Taylor speaks directly to his fans and shares his worldview about life as a sinner. And Taylor knows how to sin. As a small-town hero in the early ’90s, he threw himself into a hard-drinking, fierce-loving, live-for-the-moment life; when his music exploded, he found himself rich, wanted, and on the road. But soon his extreme lifestyle led him to question what it means to sin and whether it could—or should—be cast in a different light. After all, if sin makes us human how wrong can it be?

Now updated with a new Afterword by the author, Seven Deadly Sins is a brutally honest look “at a life that could have gone horribly wrong at any turn,” and the soul-searching and self-discovery it took to set it right.


Having read Corey’s second book last year, I sort of knew what to expect in terms of his writing style. It is rambling and at times completely incoherent, but he does throw in a lot of interesting and hilarious stories. If you’re a big fan (like I am), it’s worth the effort to push through this; otherwise, probably not. I liked his other book better, too – it made me laugh out loud more often :). But still, I’m glad I read this one as well. Corey divulges more about his personal background in this one than in the other, and the details were interesting, if often sad.

#7: Sweet Valley High #17: Love Letters

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Caroline Pearce has always been one of the least popular girls at Sweet Valley High. But when she invents a new out-of-town boyfriend, people finally start to pay attention to her. Brown-eyed, six foot Adam and his romantic love letters are the talk of the school.
Caroline has everyone fooled even clever Jessica Wakefield. But what begins as a bid for love and attention quickly becomes the worst jam of Caroline’s life, when her friends insist on meeting the boyfriend she’s been bragging about. Can Caroline keep the truth a secret, or will her lies be her downfall?


I’ve been working my way through all the SVH titles available from the Kindle Owner’s Lending Library (for some reason, you can’t borrow #1 -#12, but I think the rest of them are there). So far, this one has been my favorite. I just thought it was really cute and I liked that Caroline learns a few lessons:  namely, that it’s never a good idea to lie in order to get attention, and that the best way to make friends is to try and learn how to be a good friend yourself.

PS – I love that cover :).

#8: Supernatural: Heart of the Dragon, by Keith R.A. DeCandido

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A Supernatural novel that reveals a previously unseen adventure for the Winchester brothers, from the hit CW series!

When renegade angel Castiel alerts Sam and Dean to a series of particularly brutal killings in San Francisco’s Chinatown, they realise the Heart of the Dragon, an ancient evil of unspeakable power, is back! John Winchester faced the terrifying spirit 20 years ago, and the Campbell family fought it 20 years before that – can the boys succeed where their parents and grandparents failed?


I liked this story a lot. The fact that the demon comes back every twenty years means we get to see various members of the Winchester family fight it: first Mary (and her parents), and then John, and then finally Sam and Dean. I think this is the third of DeCandido’s Supernatural tie-ins that I’ve read and I really enjoy his no-nonsense writing style and the way he keeps the action moving. Also, this story sort of made me wish there were more books about Mary as a teen. She was cute and fun to read about :).

#9: The War of Art, by Steven Pressfield

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Think of The War of Art as tough love… for yourself.

Since 2002, The War of Art has inspired people around the world to defeat “Resistance”; to recognize and knock down dream-blocking barriers and to silence the naysayers within us. Resistance kicks everyone’s butt, and the desire to defeat it is equally as universal. The War of Art identifies the enemy that every one of us must face, outlines a battle plan to conquer this internal foe, then pinpoints just how to achieve the greatest success. Though it was written for writers, it has been embraced by business entrepreneurs, actors, dancers, painters, photographers, filmmakers, military service members and thousands of others around the world.

Steven Pressfield is the author of the novels The Legend of Bagger Vance (made into the movie starring Matt Damon and Will Smith), Gates of Fire, Tides of War, Last of the Amazons, Virtues of War, The Afghan Campaign, Killing Rommel, and The Profession. His nonfiction includes The War of Art, The Warrior Ethos, and the upcoming Turning Pro. His books are included in the curriculum at West Point and the Naval Academy, and are on the Commandant’s Reading List for the Marine Corps.


This was a short book (around 200 pages) and I read most of it in one sitting. It was very good; probably one of the best books I’ve read about writing. If anyone ever feels they need a good kick in the pants to get them started on a project (of any type) I will be sure and recommend this!

Stuff I’ve been reading.

I’m still working on whittling down that TBR pile that is threatening to get out of control (even if most of the books are digital, it still makes me anxious) :). Here are a couple I’ve read so far this year.

#1: Tales From the Clerks, by Kevin Smith

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Collects the contents from the Clerks, Chasing Dogma and Bluntman & Chronic books together with one new story and a 15-page, never before reprinted story.


 

Recently, Steve and I re-watched all the View Askew-niverse movies and it motivated me to finally read this collection of related comic book stories we’ve had on our shelf for a while (since 2009 — he’d read it, I hadn’t).

I enjoyed the stories featuring Dante and Randal the most, but the whole book had funny parts. If you’re a fan of this stuff, you’ll pretty much know what to expect but honestly, as Steve warned me when I started reading, “That’s a lot of Kevin Smith.” He was right; the raunchiness wore on me after a while. I’d recommend spacing the reading out over time!

#2: The Secret History of Twin Peaks, by Mark Frost

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From the co-creator of the landmark series, the story millions of fans have been waiting to get their hands on for 25 long years.

The Secret History of Twin Peaks enlarges the world of the original series, placing the unexplained phenomena that unfolded there into a vastly layered, wide-ranging history, beginning with the journals of Lewis and Clark and ending with the shocking events that closed the finale. The perfect way to get in the mood for the upcoming Showtime series.


 

This book isn’t old at all. I got it for Christmas from Steve :). But, hey, it still needed to be read!

This book wasn’t at all what I was expecting (not sure what exactly I was expecting, but not this) but I really enjoyed it. It is supposed to replicate a found “dossier” of documents explaining the history of Twin Peaks, and I thought the lay-out and style were very cool. I tore through it. I’m quite psyched for the new season of TP, especially after reading this; too bad it won’t air until May!

Happy reading,

Elizabeth

PS: I’ve decided to discontinue the #MinsGame posts.

Why? Because after only a couple of days in, I remembered something about myself — the fact that I do not like to edit photos.

I couldn’t see myself editing all of those pictures, just so I could post them, particularly since they are photos of things I got rid of because I was tired of looking at them :). Ha. Also, the point of my decluttering those items was so that I could be done with them! I didn’t want to dwell on my old things any longer than necessary. So that’s the end of that project :).

 

 

The Real You

So, I’ve got a new book out :).

It’s actually already been out for a couple of weeks but due to my inability to ever post about anything in a timely fashion, I am just now getting around to saying anything about it (well, I did announce it on Facebook :)).

Thanks to everyone who has downloaded The Real You already, either to buy or to borrow; I really appreciate it. If you haven’t gotten a copy yet and are interested, here’s the link.

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After publishing my 2nd book, Fear and Laundry 2, I had no intention of writing any more books set in Carreen, TX, at least not for a while. I spent a year working on a completely different project, but when NaNoWriMo 2015 rolled around, I decided to take a break from that new book and write something else.

I started from a few notes I’d made regarding the epilogue to FaL 2, and the character introduced there, named Rourke. I’d thought I might write a short story about her, but I wound up writing a full-length novel, which became The Real You. Since it came together much faster than the other project I had been working on, I decided to concentrate on Rourke’s story, instead, for a while and then go ahead and put it out.

I loved writing it and I hope y’all enjoy reading it. Much love,

Elizabeth

#MinsGame Days 3 and 4

I don’t know about anyone else, but even though it is now January 4th I still feel like I’m “coming down” from the high of the holidays. Maybe it’s because I’m easily overstimulated? I’m not sure. All I know is that even though I had a great, fun Christmas and New Year’s, I just feel kind of drained now. Which is unfortunate because it’s a new year and I would rather feel pumped up and motivated right now. Oh, well. Maybe by next week I’ll feel sufficiently recovered enough to get started on a few things :).

Speaking of overstimulating…this Minimalism Game project was fun, but decluttering is always a bit overwhelming for me. It’s hard not to feel emotional when you’re looking through and parting with your things, particularly if you’re purging a lot of items at once. I don’t want or need any of this stuff anymore but I still attach emotions to getting rid of it, even if it’s just the negative emotions of “man, I can’t believe I used to spend so much money on this,” or “I can’t believe I’ve held onto/carried this around for so long,” etc.

I’m sure those of you who have cleaned out your homes know what I’m talking about! Still, the benefit is so worth it.

To wit…

Days 3 and 4 relieved us of the following:

  • 1 water bottle, 1 mouse pad, and 1 letter file/organizer thingy (technical term)
  • 1 belt, 1 tie hanger, 1 broken USB drive, and 1 utensil holder thingy (also a technical term)

Onward to Day 5!

Minimalism Game

Happy New Year!

I hope 2017 has started off well for everybody. Steve and I had a low-key celebration here at home, as usual, and spent NYE eating our traditional meal of tamales (tofu, spinach, and cheese) and various snack foods. We watched Phantasm II (because one of Steve’s Christmas presents from me was the new re-mastered edition of the first movie and we’d watched that a few nights ago).

Anyway…In an effort to continue our seemingly never-ending de-cluttering process, Steve and I decided to play the Minimalism Game last month. We sort of cheated, I guess, because we started gathering things to get rid of way back in November, in anticipation of the game. But whatever, I don’t think there are really any hard and fast rules with this project :). I’ll be posting what we got rid of here throughout the rest of this month. And since I’m already behind (surprise, surprise), here are the first two days’ worth of stuff:

  • 1 broken chip clip
  • 2 dry erase markers

 

Exciting start, huh? 🙂 I decided to make the images black and white in an effort to make photos of clutter look somewhat appealing. Not an easy task, really.

 

 

October, 2016 horror movie round up

I’m a little later than usual with this, but here it is:  the annual list of top ten horror movies S and I watched together during the month of October. Thankfully, we had better luck picking good movies this year than last!

10) Ouija: Origin of Evil

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I thought there was a lot to like in this sequel to Ouija, particularly Lulu Wilson’s impressive performance as nine-year-old Doris Zander. All of the acting was pretty good, actually. I like Henry Thomas a lot, but that’s admittedly mainly because I saw him at a convention once and he seemed super nice and down-to-earth.

So anyway, even though parts of this movie were a bit confusing, there were enough cool elements to make me like it overall. For example, the Ouija board moving by itself…sorry, but that is just creepy. And the mystery surrounding what once went on in the Zanders’ basement…Ugh! This would probably be a good one to watch at a slumber party.

9) Hush

This is about a deaf writer who is terrorized in her home by a masked maniac — and who decides to fight back for all she’s worth.

The MC’s deafness brings a unique twist to a familiar set-up, and the story definitely kept my interest the whole way through. My only complaint about the movie is how dark it was. I mean that literally:  the villain cuts the power early on in the story, and the rest of the film plays out in deep shadow. This made it hard to follow the action at times. We turned out the lights and fiddled with the brightness on the TV, but it didn’t really help. Still a good movie, though.

8) The Boy

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After watching the trailer for this, I was so excited to see it! I guess I was hooked by the promise of a good creepy house/creepy doll story.

Well, in the end it wasn’t as great as I’d hoped, but I did enjoy it. I thought the setting was atmospheric and well done. The story was interesting, but it left me with questions and I’m still not sure how I feel about the ending. I won’t spoil it but suffice it to say it, um…didn’t go where I thought it would. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, particularly since I’m not sure if what I’d anticipated would have worked any better. Basically, I’m just not sure what I wanted from this movie, which is not the filmmakers’ fault. Ha.

7) The Conjuring 2

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For the most part, I liked the first Conjuring movie. This was better, though.

Even though the real case it’s based on seems to have been pretty thoroughly debunked, it still makes for an interesting premise for a horror movie. There were a lot of creepy moments.

My favorite element of the film, though, was the relationship between Lorraine and Ed Warren. It seems to happen so rarely that I’m always thrilled when married couples are portrayed in popular media as actually being in love and, you know, happy together. This couple even work together! Okay, they work together investigating demon possessions and whatnot, but still. They are cute.

I actually think the Warrens’ cases would make for a good TV show. Kinda like the X-Files (my favorite show of all time) but possibly even better, because the two leads would be allowed to smooch and stuff :). I don’t watch TV, but I’d be tempted to watch something like that, if someone made it.

6) Jaws

I saw Jaws as a kid and remember being terrified by it. Then I rented it as an adult and was bored stiff. I was so bored, in fact, that I didn’t even finish watching it! So I was kind of dreading watching it a third time. But this time I didn’t think it was boring at all. I actually thought it was really, really good. And I was surprised by just how gory and scary a lot of it was. Audiences in the seventies must have been freaking out when this was first released. I can see why it was such a big hit.

5) Jessabelle

I loved how straightforward this was. Maybe I’m just getting old and jaded, but I’m pretty tired of every movie trying to have a big twist to it, and/or an ambiguous ending. I know it works sometimes (trust me, I like a confusing, ambiguous movie as much as the next person), but…I’ve gotten to the point where I appreciate it so much when a movie just straight up tells me a good story without feeling as though it’s relying too heavily on gimmicks. This one had a good story. I thoroughly enjoyed watching it.

4) The Hallow

hallow

Ditto this one. Another good, solid story, featuring real monsters. “Real” in the sense that they were actual elements in the story, not just figments (or potential figments) of people’s imaginations. Monsters are a plus in my book.

3) It Follows

it-follows

I’d heard a lot about this one, both good and bad. Overall, I liked it. It kept my interest throughout, and made me wonder just what the heck was going on. There were some genuinely creepy moments, and I’m not going to lie:  when I woke up in the middle of the night after watching it, I momentarily worried I might encounter a scary naked person on my way to the bathroom :(. (Luckily I did not.)

2) Phantasm: Ravager

Okay, I’ll confess, I love me some Phantasm. So I’m a little biased on this one.

I’ve been waiting for this fifth installment in the series for what feels like forever and even though it ultimately didn’t make much sense, I still liked it. Cause hello…it’s Phantasm. And at this point, why would I expect the franchise to suddenly start making sense? It never has before. Which is part of what makes it so awesome. (Told you I don’t mind being confused).

1) The Witch

witch

I debated whether or not to include this one because it isn’t new to me (I’d seen it before, when it first came out). But I couldn’t think of anything else that deserved the number one spot on the list. I think this is a really great horror movie. It was especially cool that this time around, we saw it at an outdoor screening. The host had mentioned having a live black goat in attendance, which I was excited about, but it ultimately didn’t happen. Oh, well. Still a fun night. Now S tells me the director, Robert Eggers, is re-making Nosferatu. That is exciting to me, too. Possibly moreso than getting to see a live goat.

 


Now for the “honorable mentions.” These movies didn’t make the list, only because I had seen them before, but they are all really good:

Return of the Living Dead

Repo! The Genetic Opera

Jennifer’s Body

I also want to give a little shout out to Unfriended because I thought the way the story was told was really interesting. I don’t know that I’ll ever watch it again, but I can respect what the filmmakers did with their premise (a group of friends begin receiving messages online from a dead schoolmate). And it was good that they kept it so short, since I don’t know that the gimmick would have worked in a much longer movie.

Hellions was another movie I liked a lot, but there wasn’t enough room for it on the list. Watching this gave me a claustrophobic feeling, like I was stuck in someone’s nightmare. And that little kid’s voice constantly asking, “Dora? Can you hear me?” Yikes.

Okay, that’s it. The full list of movies we watched can be found on my husband’s blog. All links in this post are his. Happy Halloween (almost a month late)!

-Elizabeth